Posts tagged ‘chris carey’

Lake Texoma Fishing Report: “PERSONAL BEST” Striper Fishing NOW

Lake Texoma Fishing Report: “PERSONAL BEST” Striper Fishing NOW
Lake Texoma Fishing Report Question: What is the best time for your “Personal Best” Striper Fishing Trip? Depending on the will of the striper fishing gods, the answer probably is RIGHT NOW.

STINKIN’ WEATHER SAFETY
Mike Stewart, Terry Nuegin and three friends from the Panhandle arrived before dawn to find threatening clouds and the wind blowing like stink. Safety is a major factor with guides and crazy winds can make Lake Texoma very mean. “With the wind this strong before sunrise, we may have to make a safety call. But let’s give it a try anyway” Captain Chris Carey told the five fishermen.

Well out of the harbor at first light, they drifted and cast Chug Bugs onto the shallow banks. The fishing was going well with a dozen stripers hooked and exploding with a vengeance. Great strikes and fights came from 5 to 9-pound stripers who were attracted by 5-inch Big Bugs in chartreuse and chrome. Read the rest of this entry »

Texoma Striper Guide – Stripers Rampage At Lake Texoma

Texoma striper guide Chris Carey likes cool and windy weather for striper fishing. When many anglers are struggling with live bait under windy conditions in rough open waters, Carey heads for the banks with his arsenal of artificial lures.

Jim Hough, Mead OK caught his 16.5lb Striper on Chug Bug Top-water lure

Jim Hough, Mead OK – 16.5lb Striper on Chug Bug Top-water lure.

“This wind is going to be rough on those live bait guys, but I have some places we will be able to fish where the top-water action really has been hot lately.” Within minutes, Carey stopped his boat near a small island. He already had several rods rigged with two of his favorite top-water lures – Pencil Poppers and Chug Bugs.”

“We began casting the lures as close as possible to the banks of the island and retrieving them with sharp jerks from our rods. The idea is to create as much commotion with them as possible atop the rolling waves. Within minutes a striped bass weighing about seven pounds struck one of our Chug Bugs in the shallow water.”

“That fish set the stage for the great action that followed. When the action slowed, we moved to a similar island that also provided protection from the high winds. We caught several striped bass on the Pencil Poppers, it was the more noisy Chug Bugs that seemed to attract most of the strikes. The two largest bass weighed about nine pounds, and just as Carey mentioned Read the rest of this entry »